Interview With an ASVAB Test Administrator

First of all, what is the ASVAB?

 

ATA : The ASVAB is shorthand for the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. Basically it is a test administered to all candidates for enlistment into the United States Armed Services.

 

Do all candidates for enlistment need to take this test regardless of the branch of the United States Armed Services they are trying to enlist in?

 

ATA : Yes, candidates for the Army, Navy, Airforce, Marines Corps, Coast Guard and National Guard all must sit for the ASVAB.

 

What is the ASVAB used for?

 

ATA : The ASVAB is administered both to determine the candidate’s qualification for enlistment and also to determine what jobs within the United States Armed Services best suit the candidate’s skill set.

 

How do most people prepare to take the ASVAB.

 

ATA : Typically candidates for enlistment study for the ASVAB by taking an ASVAB practice test.

 

What subjects are tested in the ASVAB?

 

ATA : The ASVAB covers ten distinct subject areas in both a written section and a standardized computerized section. The ten subject areas include General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects and finally Verbal Expression.

 

Does the ASVAB practice test cover all of these subjects?

 

ATA : Yes. The ASVAB practice test is simply a prior version of the ASVAB administered in a prior year.

 

Are there any other benefits associated with taking a practice version of the ASVAB?

 

ATA : Yes. Taking a practice version of an ASVAB will introduce the candidate to the format of the test in addition to making the candidate familiar with the various subject areas.

 

Is the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery a difficult test?

 

ATA : The ASVAB can be challenging for some people. However, anyone with a high school education has a pretty good chance of passing the test if they prepare properly.

Flabbergasted-Unlimited

What does it actually mean to smell something?

 

SS : That is an odd question. What do you mean?

 

You have made the decision to join Scentsy. Therefore you work with scents on a daily basis. Scents are very much your stock and trade. You must have had some thoughts on the subject of taking in scents through the nose.

 

SS : Not really.

 

How can you say that? When a person has made the decision to join Scentsy he has decided to be a purveyor of fragrance. To make this decision necessarily means that person has decided to devote his life to scents. Surely such a decision carries with it certain philosophical curiosities. Surely the greater meaning of the olfactory experience is something you must ponder on a daily basis!

 

SS : I’ve never thought about it actually.

 

How can that be?

 

SS : I am not a philosophical person by nature. To me Scentsy is just a pay check. I did not join Scentsy because I had some existentially calling to become a purveyor of fragrance as you say. I joined Scentsy because I needed a job and Scentsy was hiring. Now don’t get me wrong. I am grateful to Scentsy for giving me the opportunity to earn an income and to be able to do so in such a flexible manner that I can make my own hours and earn as many commissions as I can sell. I like all that. But to say that I do all this because I have a calling to sell Scents is a true misrepresentation of reality. Moreover, it is also a misrepresentation of reality to say that because I sell Scents that I therefore also possess a philosophical curiosity about the nature of the sense of smell.

 

Well I’m just flabbergasted.