Interview With an ASVAB Test Administrator

First of all, what is the ASVAB?

 

ATA : The ASVAB is shorthand for the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. Basically it is a test administered to all candidates for enlistment into the United States Armed Services.

 

Do all candidates for enlistment need to take this test regardless of the branch of the United States Armed Services they are trying to enlist in?

 

ATA : Yes, candidates for the Army, Navy, Airforce, Marines Corps, Coast Guard and National Guard all must sit for the ASVAB.

 

What is the ASVAB used for?

 

ATA : The ASVAB is administered both to determine the candidate’s qualification for enlistment and also to determine what jobs within the United States Armed Services best suit the candidate’s skill set.

 

How do most people prepare to take the ASVAB.

 

ATA : Typically candidates for enlistment study for the ASVAB by taking an ASVAB practice test.

 

What subjects are tested in the ASVAB?

 

ATA : The ASVAB covers ten distinct subject areas in both a written section and a standardized computerized section. The ten subject areas include General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Automotive and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects and finally Verbal Expression.

 

Does the ASVAB practice test cover all of these subjects?

 

ATA : Yes. The ASVAB practice test is simply a prior version of the ASVAB administered in a prior year.

 

Are there any other benefits associated with taking a practice version of the ASVAB?

 

ATA : Yes. Taking a practice version of an ASVAB will introduce the candidate to the format of the test in addition to making the candidate familiar with the various subject areas.

 

Is the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery a difficult test?

 

ATA : The ASVAB can be challenging for some people. However, anyone with a high school education has a pretty good chance of passing the test if they prepare properly.

Comments are closed.

Post Navigation